What Does a Sustainable Closet Look Like? Inside the Closets of Eco Bloggers

What Does a Sustainable Closet Look Like? Inside the Closets of Eco Bloggers

Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler

Closets come in all shapes and sizes, and sustainable closets are no different. Some are small with capsule type wardrobes while others, like mine are the sign of a maximalist who doesn’t subscribe to the one in: one out theory.

How My Closet Came to Be the Size It Became

Many of you know that my husband and I bought a home two years ago that we spent just over a year renovating. It was a complete overhaul which means we got to decide the new layout. When faced with a dirty attic that was previously used for storage I took one look at it and said, “We don’t need the storage. Let’s make a closet.” This is how my wardrobe came to be roughly 250sqft. It is a big walk-in and I know it! But the space afforded me something I have always wanted: a non-seasonal wardrobe.

Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler
Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler

Living in New England layering is a must. Heavy coats, rain boots, snow boots, hats, scarves, shorts, tank tops, blouses etc. Growing up we were taught every six months (give or take) to pack things up, put them in storage, and then bring them out again when the temperatures either rose or fell. I have always disliked this approach to wardrobe organization. Boxes were inevitably misplaced or never opened each year. And, having moved so many times I had boxes and bins spread over several locations. So when I finally got the chance to design my own closet I went for an all-inclusive approach. Never again did I want to pack and unpack. My closet is now non-seasonal. Winter coats sits next to workout gear which sit next to summer tops. I can see everything in one place and never have to worry about playing the guessing game of “where is it?”. Being able to see everything also holds me accountable for not only how much I own but how I often I wear certain pieces.

Design Challenges

While using an attic is a great way to maximize the space you have it presented a few challenges. Lighting, room height, and existing structure were just a few. Putting in skylights wasn’t an option in a home from the 1700’s – at least not an option that maintained the historical character. I opted for LED recessed lighting. In the future tube lights may be an option. There was also nothing to be done about the room height. To compensate for the space, we recessed the shelves into the eaves allowing for the center of the room to stay open giving the allusion of height. But, in reality I have to bend my head down to get into many of the spaces. One of the things I love most about this house are the original beams but they proved a challenge when designing the room needed for hanging and shelves. Instead of covering them up we chose to work with them, highlighting their charm and originality.

As you can see my closet is far from finished. The floor needs attention and the shelves need a final overhaul. But, like the rest of the house my closet is a work in progress.

Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler
Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler

There are non-eco items everywhere

Yes, there are. I strive towards a sustainable closet and lifestyle everyday but that doesn’t mean I didn’t once have bad habits. My hangers are plastic (although to be fair most of them were found at yard sales and *gasp* in other people’s trash – why would they throw something out that was brand new?). My perfumes are hangovers from the days when I hadn’t yet ventured into the world of clean beauty.  I refuse to throw things out if I am still using them or just because someone or some article says so. There is an accumulation of clothing, shoes and bags from fast fashion companies. Some of these have been thrifted in recent years but the majority are quite old. I will freely admit that for a couple of years, about eight years ago, I definitely had a bad fast fashion shopping habit. The oldest purchases, still in my closet, go back almost 15 years. I still wear them so why get rid of them?

The most sustainable thing we can do is to wear what we already have and my closet is a reflection of that. I have no qualms about wearing older items that weren’t made in a sustainable manner. Moving forward with purchases I now know better, but I didn’t always. Instead of dumping these items in the trash or sending them to already overwhelmed thrift stores I choose to keep and wear them with pride and a tinge of nostalgia.

Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler
Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler
Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler

If my closet is full of non-eco items how can I call it a sustainable closet?

I’m not sure I would classify my closet as sustainable. It’s not full of items that have only provided fair labor and wages and are good for the environment. It is bigger than the average closet meaning that one day, these items will end up either in a landfill or at a thrift store. It is however, full of items I love. There are shoes which have scuff marks on them from years past yet I still wear them as if they were brand new, with pride. There are dresses from my mother and hats from my grandfather. There are bags from strangers I will never meet. I could categorically tell you about every item in my closet. I can also tell you every purchase I make moving forward is a reflection of a sustainable closet.

On average I buy about 10-20 new items a year. These are mixed and matched with previous items. As I mentioned, I don’t subscribe to the one in: one out philosophy. It’s a philosophy that has never sat quite right with me. If I still wear the pieces and I have the space for them then why should I discard them?  Instead I wear and re-wear items with a sense of love and history. Each garment and accessory tells a story that is unique and personalized.

Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler
Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler

How to build your own sustainable closet:

You don’t need 250sqft of space for a wardrobe. Most importantly work with the space you have and keep it organized.

Wear what you have. Love what you own.

When it comes to sustainability wearing what we already own is the number one thing we can do. We’ve all made shopping mistakes in the past. It’s what we do with those items that matters now. Moving forward, we need to learn to love what we own. Not in the trendy sense but in the true sense of personal style. The same holds true for new purchases. If you’re not sure about an item in the store your mind won’t change once it is in your wardrobe. By bringing in items you truly love you will wear them over and over again, year after year.

Thrift

For me, thrifting takes on three different meanings. Essentially it is clothing or accessories that are second hand. These could be borrowed from a friend, bought at a thrift store, or handed down from friends and family.

Materials Matter

Will the shirt be worn out in just under a year? Can you get the shoes resoled? Pay attention to the materials and their longevity. If you’re bringing in only the items you love, you’ll want to know that they can be repaired and patched down the road and don’t wear out quickly.

Take Care of Your Items

If you love your pieces, you’ll want to care for them. You’ll want to know that they are folded neatly into their individual spaces. Closets with clothing piled up on the floor or on the dresser are a sign of items that aren’t loved. Sure we all have our days (I absolutely detest doing laundry and thus a pile builds up every once in awhile) but on a whole we treat the items we love with respect. Our clothing is no different.

Buy Consciously

Buy new items with intention. Do you really need it? What purpose does it serve? How was it made? What is it made from? Who made it? Where did it come from? How long will I want to wear this? What will I do with it when I no longer want it? I understand this can feel like an overwhelming amount of questions to ask – after all it’s just clothing. But, clothing is more than just a garment we throw on each morning. It is an outward symbol of who we are, what are values are, and what we stand for. Buy consciously with intention; take a stand.

Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler

A sustainable closet doesn’t look any different on the outside. It is what is on the inside that makes it unique: how we treat each item, what we bring in, and our attitude towards those pieces. A sustainable closet is built with a particular mindset not with budget or space.

Want to see how other eco bloggers approach a sustainable closet? Head over to…

Leah at Stylewise: I KonMaried my Conscious Closet | A Closet Tour

Jen at Honestly Modern: Peak Inside The Closets of Ethical Style Bloggers and Creatives

Sustainable Closet / Walk In Closet / World Threads Traveler
Sustainable Closet Tour / World Threads Traveler

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Maximalists Rejoice! You too can have a sustainable wardrobe and home

Maximalists Rejoice! You too can have a sustainable wardrobe and home

Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism

Alas, I am not a minimalist. It’s not for me. There is however, something visually seductive about the glossy Pinterest photos of clean white lines, a twenty-piece wardrobe, and an entire life that could fit in the backpack that is visually stunning. But, in all practicality it makes me feel nauseous and unsettled. There is nothing homey or comforting, to me, about those clean white lines. I am a self-prescribed maximalist who enjoys a layered approach of items with a history and a personal connection. While I enthusiastically applaud the efforts of those who undertake minimalism I am a tiger who can’t change her stripes – nor should I have to.

If you follow sustainable fashion whether on social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, on blogs, watch the occasion documentary or news story then you know minimalism is trending in synch with sustainability.  Much needed attention is being given to the act of intentional living and surrounding oneself with only the necessities. It’s a movement that as Joshua Becker writers on Becoming Minimalist: embraces the freedom from the passion to possess, freedom from modern mania, freedom from duplicity, and the focus on the internal not the external. But this post isn’t about minimalism. It’s about maximalism.

Maximalist rejoice! You too can have a sustainable wardrobe and home but first let’s clear some things up.

Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism

Why Don’t Minimalism and Sustainability Go Hand-In-Hand?

On the surface minimalism sounds like the perfect companion to sustainability and a greener lifestyle. Less things mean an eco-lifestyle, right? Not necessarily. Every minimalist will at some point in their life have to buy new products. They will have to wash their face, brush their teeth, get dressed in the morning (unless they live in a nudist colony to which I have no rebuttal), cook meals, sleep on a bed, and so on. The products they acquire may or may not be sustainable. They are either good for the environment and pay respect to the people who made them or they don’t. This is the essence of sustainability: the practice of purchasing products – as needed – in a manner which takes into consideration the lives of future generations. And, I would like to add the human condition of present. As a minimalist acquires products they must adhere to the sustainability ethos in order to do no harm. It doesn’t matter how many things you have – if they are harmful to your wellbeing, your wallet, the environment, and the larger global community – then minimalism isn’t sustainable. Only they can decide how their purchases, be them many items or few, will affect future generations. But, minimalism shouldn’t be confused with sustainability.

Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism
Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism

What is Maximalism?

Minimalism stands on one side of the spectrum while maximalism on the other. In the middle: mass consumerism that is affected and swayed by marketing and advertising (read fast fashion and trends). You might be surprised to hear that minimalism and maximalism have more in common than you think.

Maximalism is the visual and tactile explosion of color, pattern, and texture. It isn’t limiting yourself to a certain number of items but instead introduces objects that have a clear purpose. When you look at successful maximalists you’ll see there is a reason – an intention – for each item. It is the layering of items, which sometimes appear contradictory; whether that be your clothing or your home décor, in a way that brings you joy. Maximalism shouldn’t be confused with hoarding. Like minimalism each item is carefully acquired and curated with intention. Every item has and serves a purpose. It’s not about having stuff crammed into every drawer or tucked away where it won’t be used.

“Maximalism shouldn’t be confused with hoarding. Like minimalism each item is carefully acquired and curated with intention.”

Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism

Successful maximalist, while their homes may seem like a kaleidoscope of colors and items – sometimes chaos – can tell you where every item is, why they love it, what purpose it serves, and where they bought it from. Maximalism also isn’t about buying unconsciously or compulsively. Much like minimalism, only with more items, maximalism is about the freedom from external pressures, it is intentional, and it is uniquely individual.

Mass consumerism has told us we need to buy the newest fashion trends, the latest gadgets, to update our kitchens every ten years, to acquire the latest fitness tools, the best seller books, and to generally keep up with the “Joneses” or the latest Instagram “influencers”. The list is endless. Maximalism bucks this mass consumerist trend by acquiring objects and items that serve a personal meaning. Think of it more like a collector with various interests but a deep appreciation and understanding of the value of each item.

It’s not about giving into consumerist trends and advertising dollars but instead finding joy in items that ring true to their unique personality. (Sorry Marie Kondo. I won’t be decluttering anytime time soon. A true maximalist doesn’t have clutter.) It’s highly unlikely that you will find a maximalist in a department store or on any high street. They are ignored in favor of items that are unique, one of a kind, often vintage, and speak to the individual on a level that isn’t relatable to the general market. Instead, you’ll most likely find them tucked away in a store that isn’t easily found. There they will be deep in conversation with the owner learning about the history of each item, the method in which they were made, and the owners own life story. It is a connection that is lost with mass consumerism but found in the homes of maximalists.

“Neither minimalism nor maximalism are sustainable unless you intentionally practice sustainability.”

Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism

A Sustainable Wardrobe or Home Is What You Make It

Be you a minimalist or a maximalist, sustainability is how you approach buying. Neither is sustainable unless you intentionally practice sustainability.  Owning a hundred items doesn’t inherently make you sustainable and owning a thousand things doesn’t inherently make you unsustainable. It’s all in the approach. So, if minimalism isn’t for you and you find yourself drawn towards the layering of colors, patterns and textures, how do you do it sustainably?

*Avoid Trendy Pieces:

Maximalist eschew trendy pieces (even holiday decorations) in favor of items that are timeless and speak to their individual design aesthetic. If platform shoes are in style a maximalist will forgo buying them in favor of the kitten heels which they have carefully curated and prefer.

*Second Hand:

To be sustainable, filling up your home and wardrobe with pieces should be second hand. This could be an online vintage Hermes scarf or a trip to your local Goodwill to procure Champaign flutes. Buy only buy what speaks to you. If you are undecided about an item, leave it. You will find another similar in the future and it isn’t worth the regret later that the item isn’t quite what you wanted or doesn’t fit your design personality. These are the pieces that will end up in the trash a year later if you’re not careful. To get an idea of the kind of second hand/vintage pieces you can find online check out: Sustainable Gift Ideas For Collectors.

*Family Heirlooms:

Personally, I love family heirlooms – pictures, pitchers, furniture, or my favorite – clothing. Every time I pick up an item that has been passed down through the generations I feel a sense of belonging; a sense of history which is not relatable to others. It’s as personal as items can get. *Careful to not be the dumping ground for everyone’s stuff. Only take items which you love and which you can find a well deserving spot for in your home or closet. *

*Salvage:

This might be a bit controversial or yucky to some of you but indulge me for a moment. Growing up my dad would tell me about how when he was putting himself through law school he worked as a garbage man. While working, he was able to furnish my mother’s and his home through things that were left on the side of the road. Many of these items were brand new – still in their boxes, some were not. My husband and I too have been known to stop curbside to procure items which we have been looking for including countertop stools and wardrobes. With a little TLC these items are as good as new.

*Shop With Intention:

Whether you are a minimalist or a maximalist your intention behind each purchase is important. As I mentioned, maximalist don’t shove things in drawers to then be forgotten. Will you use it? What significance does it hold? What is its end life? These are important questions that you need to be able to answer in a sustainable manner regardless of which side of spectrum you find yourself on.

*Repurpose:

As a maximalist your home and wardrobe will be full of items that you love. What is their end life? Is it something that will gain value over time – something vintage? Or is it something that can be upcycled? What is it made from? Most maximalists appreciate products that are made from materials which are environmentally friendly. (Synthetics don’t often go hand in hand with craftsmanship). Many, if not most environmentally friendly products can be repurposed or upcycled. If not directly used by their original owners, these items can be responsibly broken down and reimaged by companies that specialize in such transactions. Know the end of life use for each product.

*Support Small Businesses:

Maximalists are often enchanted by the stories behind each product which is why they choose to purchase one of a kind, bespoke, and/or from small businesses. This means purchases from Amazon or high street stores are few and far between. By purchasing from small businesses they not only supporting the local community but can learn to differentiate from items which are mass produced and those which are environmentally friendly and fairly made.

*Work With The Space You Have Not What You Might Have:

Maximalism is not hoarding. It is not about shoving things in the attic, the basement, or in every empty drawer. Maximalist will fill the space they have but ONLY that space. They don’t utter the words “one day” or “when I have a bigger place”. This is true for their wardrobe as well. To make their wardrobe sustainable they not only buy items that are manufactured in an eco-manner but they don’t tuck things away in bins that are discovered a year or two later. Use the space you have. Layer it with color, texture, and patterns but do not hide items away for a “someday” scenario.

Maximalism isn’t about mindless consumption. It isn’t about filling spaces because they are there.

Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism

If you want a sustainable wardrobe and home remember…

Maximalism isn’t about mindless consumption. It isn’t about filling spaces because they are there. It is about the careful curation of items, feeling a close connection to their history, and an understanding and appreciation for their construction. It isn’t about how much you buy but where it comes from, how it is made, and what it supports be it the environment or the people who made it (ideally both), and its end of life.

With these tips maximalists, you too, can have a sustainable wardrobe and home.

Maximalism isn’t for you?

Not every shoe will fit everyone. Here are a few resources on practicing minimalism in a sustainable manner if you find that maximalism isn’t your cup of tea.

How to Incorporate Minimalism into all Areas of Your Life

5 Simple Mindsets Changes for a Happy Clutter-Free Life

 

Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism
Cait Bagby, World Threads Traveler, World Threads, Sustainable Fashion, Sustainable Wardrobe, Maximalism

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Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

The genius of Charmed by a Cause is not only that it’s ethical jewelry, handcrafted from 100% recycled materials, and gives back. The genius of Charmed by a Cause jewelry is that you wouldn’t know any of that just by looking at it.

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

*This post is sponsored by Charmed By A Cause. All opinions, styling, and feedback are my own and in no way influenced by the company. You know my policy: If I like your brand, believe you are working towards authentic sustainable practices, and actually enjoy your products then I will help to raise brand awareness. If not, we don’t work together.

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

What Is Ethical Jewelry?

I talk so much about sustainable fashion that I sometimes forget to point out all that goes into completing a look. Jewelry can compliment an outfit like no other accessory can. And, it’s timeless. Invest in the right pieces and they will last a lifetime. Not just because of their materials but because of their design and versatility.

When founders Regan Caton and Betsy Milliken design jewelry they combine this mindset with an eye on leveraging their craft for good. To be considered ethical jewelry or sustainable jewelry, the same principles that apply to eco friendly fashion must be met. Materials must be sourced in ways that do not harm individuals or the environment. Production must take into consideration the rights and economic status of workers. Charmed by a Cause certainly practices these  modes of production and they go one step further by giving back to the local community.

Charmed by a Causes ethical practices start right where you would want them to: at the sourcing of materials. Each piece is sculpted using 100% recycled 14tk gold and sterling silver. The stones are either ethically sourced, lab grown, or reclaimed.

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

What is Handcrafted Jewelry

Keeping in mind the potential heavy environmental impact the jewelry industry can have, Regan and Betsy decided from the outset to be different. It’s just as easy for jewelry companies to outsource their production as it is for the fashion industry. But, in order to keep the lightest possible carbon footprint, Charmed by a Cause pieces are handcrafted in NYC. If you are ever in New York you might even pass by the person who single handedly crafted your piece. Each as unique as the person who made it.

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

Jewelry Pricing

Fine jewelry often comes with a fine price tag. But, when you keep design and production local paired with the use of upcycled materials the traditional retail markups don’t apply. Charmed By A Cause is transparent on this point. When looking at each piece on the website they give you both their price and what you would pay if they applied the suggested traditional retail pricing. Your savings are right there for you to see. You’ll never look at other jewelry companies the same again.

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

What Does Giving Back Mean?

As if it wasn’t enough to create a company that manufactures and sells ethical jewelry, that is handcrafted from 100% recycled materials and locally, they also give back to the global community. Upon checkout you can choose from three Cause Partners: The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, The Covenant House, or the Woodstock Farm Sanctuary. Subsequently, Charmed by a Cause will give 20% of the purchase price to the cause you choose. They can donate twenty-percent of the purchase by keeping their jewelry pricing fair and transparent, and their production local. And, in the end it’s your decision where the 20% ends up.

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

Don’t Forgot About Ethical Engagement Rings

Consumers are becoming more aware of the strains traditionally manufactured jewelry can place on the environment and the workforce. They want something more. They want something ethical. Regan and Betsy are answering these questions by creating custom made ethical engagement rings. Each one is meticulously crafted with the individual in mind using the same principles as their everyday pieces.

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand
Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

Design Aesthetic

By now you probably want to know my thoughts on their designs. Well here goes: They are incredibly detailed. The snake ring, hoop earrings, and charm from their new collection are the perfect examples of this. They prove that sustainable jewelry can be both elegant and bad a** (as Bobby has described them.) And, he’s not wrong. Charmed by a Cause pieces demonstrate a unique sophistication with an element of edginess. Depending on how you choose to style your complete look, you can choose whether you want the pieces to stand out or blend seamlessly. Personally, I think they deserve to be the main point of focus. And, as for my husband who has become enamored with them I guess I know what he’ll be getting for Christmas this year: a pair of cufflinks. The hardest part will be deciding which ones to get him.

 

Handcrafted Ethical Jewelry That Gives A Helping Hand

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Recycled Plastic Bottles Make The Perfect Tote

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make The Perfect Tote

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler

Ever wonder what happens to all those single use water bottles? Curricular/Extracurricular is taking those recycled plastic bottles and turning them into some of the most gorgeous sustainable bags on the market.

*This post is sponsored by Curricular/Extracurricular. All opinions, styling, and feedback are my own and in no way influenced by the company. You know my policy: If I like your brand, believe you are working towards authentic sustainable practices, and actually enjoy your products then I will help to raise brand awareness. If not, we don’t work together.

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler

Imagine my surprise when I found a brand that ticks all the sustainability boxes. From environmentally friendly, fair labor practices, locally made, vegan, and uber stylish, C/E has it going on.

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler

Sustainability is at the very core of Curricular/Extracurricular. Founders Erin and Rebecca started C/E from two different vantage points. While Rebecca got her degree in fashion (her design ethos is clear in every detail), Erin took a more circuitous route. During her time working for the government, Erin’s interactions with Fortune 500 companies, foreign governments, and international organizations helped her see the possibilities of best corporate practice. C/E is the combination of these perspectives and a deep concern for the environment.

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler

So why use recycled plastic bottles?

On average,1,500 single use water bottles are used every second in the United States. In a years time this amounts to approximately 50 billion plastic water bottles. Of those 50 million plastic bottles only 23 percent are recycled leaving 38 billion that go straight into landfills, ditched on the side of the road, or end up in the ocean.

Founders of C/E saw these statistics and knew something had to change. Using their past experiences, Rebecca and Erin set about reducing waste by using recycled plastic bottles in the construction of their bags and wallets. If that’s not motivation to recycle, I don’t know what is!

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler
Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler

I love their Waverly Tote and the Thomson Wallet. Both are constructed from polyester made from recycled water bottles and organic cotton. Here are my thoughts:

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler

The Waverly Tote

I absolutely love the size of this tote (and you all know how much I love a great tote bag)! The straps are the perfect length for comfortable use. I took both the tote and wallet on a three day straight run. They came with me to NYC, a day working at the library, and packing as a carryon. Aside from how comfortable the Waverly Tote is, I absolutely love how easy it is to clean. The faux leather makes wiping it down super easy. Loading the bag up with purchases from NYC, a computer for the library, and other everyday essentials – at no point did it feel uncomfortable but stretched in just the right places for comfort without stressing the seams.

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler
Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler

The Thomson Wallet

I need to mention the color first because I love a good pop of color that can be flashed when appropriate. I chose Cranberry which runs a bit more on a pinker side. This wallet is the absolute perfect size. It’s big enough for credit cards, cash, phone, the rogue lipstick, and even a collapsible reusable straw. I’m really looking forward to using the Thomson Wallet as an evening clutch as well.

Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler
Recycled Plastic Bottles Make For The Perfect Tote / World Threads Traveler

Signature

Who knew recycled plastic bottles could be so chic and practical. It’s obvious that Erin and Rebecca know what they’re doing and I can’t wait to see their future designs.

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Not so basic basics with Encircled

Not so basic basics with Encircled

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

It has come to my attention that in the history of WTT I have never featured an outfit in more than one style! Honestly, I couldn’t believe this because in those moments when I’m not shooting pictures (which is most of the time) my outfits are constantly on repeat: either as individual pieces, mixed and matched with well-worn items, or in their entirety. After all, when it comes to sustainable fashion, isn’t that what it’s all about? So why haven’t I been highlighting this on the blog? While I don’t have a verbal answer – today’s post is just that: I’m showing you how I wear one outfit in two ways.

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

*This post is sponsored by Encircled. All opinions, styling, and feedback are my own and in no way influenced by the company. You know my policy: If I like your brand, believe you are working towards authentic sustainable practices, and actually enjoy your products then I will help to raise brand awareness. If not, we don’t work together.

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

With temperatures still approaching 100 degrees, but knowing that cooler weather is right around the corner, I’ve been searching for pieces that I can stay cool in now but can layer in just a few short weeks when the heat finally breaks. Oh, and I’d like the pieces to be ultra-comfy without sacrificing the ability to style for a low-key day as well as a night out. Hmm… am I asking too much from my clothing? Meet Encircled.

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

Encircled has been on my radar from quite some time. Their commitment to sustainability has always been top notch and I’ve seen other bloggers rave about the quality and fit of their pieces. So why did I wait so long to give them a try? Here’s where my own style biased comes into play. I am not a “basics” person. When I first looked through Encircled’s website I was a bit overwhelmed with the simple silhouettes/multi-wear mix and match. If there is one thing I have come to learn about my closet, it’s that I am not a simple silhouettes person – and that’s okay. It’s better to know your personal style than to buy pieces you won’t actually wear.

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

But I’ll be the first to admit, here and now, that I definitely judged wrongly; Just because you see pieces styled one way on a company’s website doesn’t mean you should pass it over because you don’t immediately think it will fit into your style ethos.

After moving past my own prejudice I dove in and gave the new Encircled Remix Collection a try. Here’s what it consists of: The Remix Boxy Top, the Remix Crop Pant, and the Remix Short – put those together and you get a stylishly flexible outfit that definitely meets all the criteria I mentioned above – comfortable, able to dress up or down, ethically on point, and versatile enough to layer through seasonal changes. So I took the pieces for a test run through one entire day and brought my camera along for you to see.

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

Okay, so my day in this outfit didn’t exactly start in the morning. Admittedly I spent half the day in my pajamas catching up on emails. But, in the afternoon I went to visit a fellow farmer and pick some peaches for dessert. (Highly recommend Nicewicz Farm if your ever in Massachusetts). This was the perfect time to test out the Remix Shorts as it was still pretty hot out. I wanted to keep the outfit minimal so I paired them with a structured striped button down that has been in my closet since what feels like the dawn of time and my gardening hat to keep the sun out of my eyes. Only other accessory was a basket for all the peaches.

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

Initial impressions: They have pockets! I know that may seem like a weird initial impression but flowy garments don’t tend to have pockets so I was duly impressed. After moving around in the shorts for a while I thought something was off. I felt like I still had my pajamas on – yes, they are really that comfortable. The use of Tencel helps to give them a buttery softness that may make you question if you even have them on at all.

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

After picking (and eating) our fill of peaches, we headed home to get ready for a night out. This was the perfect time to change into the Remix Boxy Top and Remix Crop Pant. From the get-go the crop pants were definitely my thing: same softness as the shorts, great high waist, flowy cut, and perfect length. The boxy top I admittedly struggled with a bit. Everything about it is perfect from the material to the cut but… and I say this cautiously because I know not everyone is the same, but when I’m headed out for the night I prefer a bit more of a tailored feel to my clothing. This was the perfect opportunity to see just how versatile these pieces could be with a bit of accessorizing. With just a belt and necklace the entire outfit was transformed. I was able to pull in the waist lines and accentuate the flawless cut of the neckline without taking any of the comfort away. After dinner on the car ride home I easily took off the belt to feel more comfortable from eating just a bit too much – I’m thinking I already know what outfit I’ll be wearing for Thanksgiving!

Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

Final thoughts: Ahh… I know this is a long post but when trying to cover three pieces it was bound to happen. Let’s see if I can succinctly wrap up my entire experience with the Encircled Remix Collection:

  • Don’t judge a book by its cover. I did when first scrolling through the Encircled website. While basics don’t’ call out to me, you can easily style the pieces to fit your individual style.
  • If you’re looking for pieces that are unbelievably comfortable, flattering, perfect for layering and versatility, AND will go the distance the Remix Collection is where you should start.
  • Throughout the day I felt like I had my pajamas on. I really can’t stress enough just how soft the material is and how perfectly cut the pieces are.
  • My first criteria when thinking about buying any item is to look at the company’s commitment to sustainability. Encircled goes above and beyond to uphold sustainable practices across the board (I won’t go into detail in this post because it’s already really long but you can and definitely should check out their story and practices here)
  • After wearing each of the pieces for several hours and then again over the next few days I know they will be mixed and matched individually and worn as a complete outfit for many years to come. – Honestly I may even wear them to bed – did I mention how comfortable they are? 🙂
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler
Not so basic basics with Encircled, World Threads Traveler

Knowing that I will re-wear these pieces long into the future should I do another post in the winter with Encircled Remix Collection pieces styled differently?

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Morning Love Letters

Morning Love Letters

Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler

“A love letter can be very short or it can be long; it can be literary or non-literary; it can be bright or dark, cheerful or tragic. But above all, for a love letter to be a love letter it must be sincere!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan

When we think of love letters we conjure up images of handwritten pieces of paper that are filled with versus of love, devotion, and sincerity. They are the words that we don’t readily confess and the best love letters will take an entire lifetime to write, if they are ever written at all. But, not all love letters are literary. Not all love letters are handwritten scripts carefully folded into an envelope for our love ones to discover. Some love letters are those which “move through the widest range of emotions – devotion, disappointment, grief and indignation, self-confidence, ambition, impatience, self-reproach and resignation“. A true love letter stirs up in us a complicated emotional cocktail.

*This post is sponsored by Ten Thousand Villages. All opinions, styling, and feedback are my own and in no way influenced by the company. You know my policy: If I like your brand, believe you are working towards authentic sustainable practices, and actually enjoy your products then I will help to raise brand awareness. If not, we don’t work together.

Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler

It’s this emotional cocktail that I have found during my discovery of sustainable companies. A garment or item made with such care, history, detail, and humanity hold all the indescribable complexities and sentiments as a love letter. Ten Thousand Villages has been able to capture the essence of what true love is in, not only with their products but business practices.

Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler
Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler
Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler

I had the absolute pleasure of visiting the Ten Thousand Villages Boston store this past winter while doing some Christmas shopping. (You’ll probably run into me there a lot!) It was incredibly surprising and yet relieving to find a Fair Trade store in downtown Boston that made sustainable shopping accessible. What started off as a little bit of shopping – a bag for my sister-in-law, a drum for my brother-in-law, and a pair of earrings for my friend – turned into an evening listening to some incredible ladies talk about Fair Trade, what is means, how Ten Thousand Villages operates, and how Fair Trade is more than just a buzzword. I was wholeheartedly impressed with their mission, breadth of products, and absolute command of the topic. It was clear that Ten Thousand Villages employees, not just corporate, was aware of how their business operated, where their products were made, how they were made, and even who made them. Their motto #livelifefair could not be more accurate.

Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler

As soon as I got home I dug into learning as much as I could about Ten Thousand Villages. I wanted to know how a company of that size, with that many varying products to offer, could operate sustainably and so succinctly inline with their Fair Trade ethos. Here’s what I learned…

The company was founded in 1946 and has since gone on to operate in 30 developing countries and providing 20,000 jobs to artisans whose skills are prized for their time-honored traditions. Artisans work with local materials which are natural or recycled creating unique, one-of-a-kind pieces in which no two will ever be the exact same while ensuring an eye is kept on environmental sustainability. Prices are negotiated ahead of time and paid in advance in order to foster an atmosphere of trust but also provide resiliency for the artisans. By creating a company with extraordinary oversight and transparency, Ten Thousand Villages has been able to build a truly unique company that encourages and empowers artisans and consumers alike.

Their vision that “one day all artisans in developing countries will earn a fair wage, be treated with dignity and respect, and be able to live a life of quality” is enough to stir in you the same emotions that can only be found in a love letter. On its surface it’s a simple message. But, to achieve this vision one must first take a hard look at the current wide-spread, mainstream practices which remind us of “devotion, disappointment, grief and indignation, self-confidence, ambition, impatience, self-reproach and resignation.” Ten Thousand Villages is writing plainly for all to see; while there may be heartache in the current model, they are doing their bit, one step at a time, to ensure an enduring, sustainable, and sincere business model which needs to be replicated across the industry.

Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler
Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler
Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler

When the opportunity to work with Ten Thousand Villages came up I leapt at the chance. I couldn’t image a more deserving company. The products they offer are extensive (you can check out what they offer here. Everything from clothing and accessories, to home goods, outdoor goods, for your office, kitchen, self and much much more). Their ability of offer so many options is due to their longstanding history of transparency, fair wages, environmental protection, and due diligence. For me, I chose the Flowering Vines Robe for the simple reason that I needed a new robe and fill my home and closet, one at a time, with items that are truly sustainable. The Robe is made from cotton in India using a block-printing method (read more about this ancient tradition here) which is incredibly time consuming and detailed – all of which shows when you see the robe up close and personal. Sizing is perfect and I have a feeling this robe is going to wear to sheer comfort each time it’s donned.

Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler
Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler

It feels as though Ten Thousand Villages has written a love letter to both consumers and artisans. They have made a promise to be there, to uphold the strictest of love in what the do and how they conduct themselves. Their confidence is evident, shown with their breadth of products without feeling overwhelming. They know exactly what we as the consumer are looking for while reminding us that the person behind each items creation is of equal value and deserving of respect, commitment, and honesty. It’s a love letter that they started writing in 1946 with the promise of leaving the world a little better than they found it. It’s the type of love letter I want to read over and over again. 

Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler
Love Letters for the Soul / World Threads Traveler

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All in the Details with Artisan & Fox

All in the Details with Artisan & Fox

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

For as long as I can remember I have been a detail oriented person. I take joy in finding the hidden stories, character, purpose, and flaws that are lacking in the abundance of mass produced products. My home and closet are full of pieces that tell a story which might not be apparently obvious at first glance. That’s why I was excited to find Artisan & Fox.

*This post is sponsored by Artisan & Fox. All opinions, styling, and feedback are my own and in no way influenced by the company. You know my policy: If I like your brand, believe you are working towards authentic sustainable practices, and actually enjoy your products then I will help to raise brand awareness. If not, we don’t work together.

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

To be honest it’s a bit difficult to know where to start when describing what Artisan & Fox does – there’s just so much goodness to this company! Let’s try to break it down.

Artisan & Fox was founded with the mission of helping skilled artisans across the world secure a living while also introducing the wider global population to the craftsmanship that is passed down over several centuries.

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby
All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby
All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

Artisan & Fox goes further than just providing jewelry, bags, scarves, and other small accessories to the global marketplace. By working closely with the artisans, small groups, and social enterprises they are ensuring sweatshop practices are non-existent in their supply chain while also providing a means for artisans to earn a living wage which not only supports their immediate family but also empowers the local community and economy.

This is an incredibly important point to consider when looking for sustainable fashion and accessories. As many of you know sustainable fashion can be broken down into several different value points including worker’s rights which is incredibly important to me. I won’t even consider a company that doesn’t meet the highest of standards. Artisan & Fox not only upholds these values but provides a model which many companies could learn from.

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

#knowyourartisan is a concept taken incredibly serious by Artisan & Fox. They want to ensure customers are acquainted with who made their products by not only providing where each piece was made but also by including the name of each artisan with every single product. By partnering with local artisans and communities the company helps those with limited reach access the global market. This is transparency in its highest form. The company further ensures that each artisan receives 50 percent of the profits for each piece sold and reinvesting the remaining 50 percent into social programs.

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

Artisan & Fox Jewelry

Admittedly I don’t wear much jewelry. I prefer to wear the same pieces on a daily basis – occasion jewelry just isn’t my thing but I realize I may be an anomaly on this front. Artisan & Fox offers a variety of options that suit the individual regardless if your looking for timeless pieces or something for a special occasion. I love that you can see the unique character of each piece indicative of the time and attention that went into its creation made by an individual. No two pieces will ever be quite the same as another

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby
All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

Artisan & Fox Afghanistan

The Aram Bracelet is handcrafted in Kabul, Afghanistan by Massouda. Don’t let its minimalist design fool you. The bracelet holds its own as an individual piece or when stacked with others. Delicately crafted from brass with gold plating, Artisan & Fox provides a handy cleaning tutorial on their website to help ensure it lasts a lifetime and then some. “To polish your artisan’s craft, use a wedge of lemon, and polish along the surface with a small towel.” Ethical and environmentally friendly!

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

The Roya Earrings are also handcrafted in Kabul from Lapis Lazul and gold plated brass by Nusrat. I love their subtlety with the pop of bright blue that doesn’t detract from their construction. When looking for jewelry not only do I want to know the story behind each piece but also look for pieces that can I can seamlessly integrate into any outfit and can transition from day to night. The Roya Earrings are this and much more.

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby
All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby
All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

The details are important: from where something is made, to who made it, to what materials are used, compensation structure, aesthetics, and those tiny imperfections that make it one of a kind. Artisan & Fox has created a truly unique company that provides so many advantageous opportunities to workers around the world all while preserving centuries old traditions, providing economic empowerment, and allowing the wider world population to find pieces that are truly unique to them. I for one will be a repeat customer.

All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby
All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby
All in the details with Artisan & Fox - World Threads Traveler / Cait Bagby

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Responsible Leather: How It’s Possible

Responsible Leather: How It’s Possible

responsible leather Central Grazing Company

*This post was sponsored by Central Grazing Company. All opinions, styling, and feedback are my own and in no way influenced by the company. You know my policy: If I like your brand, believe you are working towards authentic sustainable practices, and actually enjoy your products then I will help to raise brand awareness. If not, we don’t work together.

What if our leather could be ethical? What if our farming could actually benefit the environment? What if our meat processing could be a closed-loop system? Central Grazing Company, based out of Kansas, set out to tackle these questions and find a solution, resulting in the manufacturing of responsible leather.

Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler

When I first entertained the idea of working with Central Grazing Company I was a bit weary. In the world of sustainability there is a divide over whether or not ethical should be included under that umbrella. Personally, I prefer the data to do all the talking and reach a conclusion solely based on whatever that data presents. But maybe it’s time to redefine ethical. Maybe it’s time to put facts and figures transparently on display when it comes to using animal byproducts. CGC is doing just that putting my unease to rest.

Worldwide our meat consumption isn’t slowing down. While some western countries have seen their meat consumption decrease, in countries like India and China, it’s on the rise. By 2050 “global meat production will double…to about 1.2 trillion pounds a year, putting further pressure on the environment and human health.” However, companies like CGC are doing their part to revolutionize the meat production and leather product industries creating a closed-loop, environmentally beneficial system.

Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler
Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler

What is Responsible Leather?

Leather has no longer become a byproduct of the meat industry: just the opposite is true in fact. Our desire for leathers has exploded meaning animals are now being raised explicitly for their hides and not necessarily for their meat. Central Grazing Co. is taking the mystery out of this frequently untraceable system by providing  direct farm-to-fashion accountability. The company proudly works with local farmers to ensure the highest animal welfare standards, going a step further by being A Greener World’s Animal Welfare Approved company. Working with small farmers who use regenerative techniques allows them to steer clear of the factory farms, which contribute so much to environmental degradation.  Instead CGC works with local farmers, in the United States, to ensure the sheep are free roaming and able to graze as nature intended. This in turn allows the sheep to naturally fertilize the land, providing healthy grasslands which capture atmospheric carbon. Additionally by allowing for natural grazing, the sheep’s waste become a natural fertilizer, free of any hormones, antibiotics, or other typically seen disruptors. Meaning that should in the future the land be turned over from grassland to crops, or even natural environment the soil is rich and ready for use.

Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler

Not only is this system beneficial to the preservation of midwest prairies but the farmers retain their own lands and contracts while helping to support the local communities and providing a higher wage than traditional factory farms. Each farm is AWA certified and a revenue-sharing program “that pays farmers for achieving high animal welfare and ecological standards” has been employed.

CGC doesn’t stop there. In 2015 the company began selling lamb meat to local grocery stores but have expanded to natural food wholesalers, retail and other foodservice markets. The move to fashion was a no brainer for founder Jacqueline, whose goal it is to have a complete closed-loop system ensuring whole animal usage. Instead of dumping the lambskins into the landfill she took responsibility and created the beautiful designs now in its Kickstarter phase.

Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler
Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler
Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler

Jacqueline doesn’t stop at whole animal usage either. She goes further employing small family owned tanneries in the United States who vegetable tan the lambskins using artisans techniques and chestnut extracts. And, if that wasn’t responsible enough, instead of coating the bags and accessories in the typical plastic coating to preserve their aesthetic, her company applies a wax coating which allows the leather to naturally age over time giving a unique, one-of-a-kind, appearance that can’t be replicated. But it isn’t just the exterior she is concerned about: organic cotton  liners with minimal hardware help to preserve a minimal environmental footprint.

Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler

Why I Support Central Grazing Company & You Should Too

When it comes to transparency, closed-loop production, regenerative farming, made in USA, worker’s rights and fair wages, whole animal usage, and minimal environmental footprint – CGC is leading the way. Jacqueline has managed to build a company that encompasses the very best of what fashion could and should be. Possessing a minimal design CGC has created products that are not only built to last a lifetime, but can be passed down from one generation to the next with the same ease of style each piece possesses today.

Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler

Look Details, Where to Buy, & How to Support Responsible Leather

Central Grazing Company is now in the Kickstarter phase raising an amazing $17,000 in their first few days but they still have a bit to go to their goal of $21,500. Funding starts at as little as $5 and goes up to $565 depending on what level of contribution you would like to make. The Meg Bag which I styled, in Caramel with suede side panels, is included in some funding donations with early bird incentives included.

To check out and support Central Grazing Company check out their Kickstarter initiative here: Ethically & Eco made Luxury Leather Bags & Wallets.

Honestly, I could have styled this bag with any outfit. It’s the perfect size for daytime or evening and the colors neutral without being boring. While Jacqueline mentions the use of minimal hardware I think each piece speaks loudly – maybe in part because it’s not competing with a million other details. The brass feet gave me assurance that setting it down wouldn’t scuff or ruin the bottom and the single strap meant I didn’t have to worry about how I wanted to hold it, whether on my shoulder or arm. Personally, the Meg bag has become my go-to quick grab when I’m running out the door. It holds everything without being overwhelmingly large.

It’s rare to see a single accessory transform the fashion industry but Central Grazing Company has created just that. They have redefined what farm-to-fashion means while presenting a solution to many of the ethical, environmental, and human concerns rampant in the current fast fashion climate.

Responsible Leather - World Threads Traveler

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Spring Transitional Pieces with Rent the Runway

Spring Transitional Pieces with Rent the Runway

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

April and May can be a tricky time for wardrobe everywhere. Thankfully companies like Rent the Runway make finding spring transitional pieces easier.

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler
Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler
Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

I live in a place where the weather is not predictable at all, especially in the spring. It used to be that April and May were slightly warm, rainy, and flowers were starting to bloom. The past couple of years it seems that it has been snowing later and later well into the end of April. This means that some days it’s warm enough to wear short sleeves, other days you need to be bundled up to a snow storm, while still having your rain boots ready in case of torrential showers.  There’s a great saying “if you don’t like the weather wait five minutes.” New Englanders have become really good at dressing in layers and understanding we should expect any weather pattern – no matter how absurd.

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

While all this weather fluctuation might seem like a giant pain when it comes to getting dressed, most of us have gotten layering down to a science. But more importantly, we know how to do spring transitional pieces seamlessly. Many of us don’t have seasonal closets because although there are four seasons they can all happen, and frequently do, in one day (or hour) no matter what time of year.

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

For me spring transitional pieces mean long sleeve but lightweight dresses. I like dresses that give my skin a bit of shielding from left over winter winds or harsh sun. They are always easily layered with a trench, winter coat, or moto-jacket. They can be worn with heels, boots, or flats. Really the combinations are endless.

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler
Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

And, I like my bags like I like my other spring transitional pieces. I want them to be versatile. Out for a night – handheld please. At the farmers market – easily tuck-able under my arm. Sloshing through the snow – long strap to throw it on my shoulder. When choosing my pieces for this spring I opted for the Elizabeth & James Small Canary Market Bag. It comes in various finishes but I was particularly drawn to the snake skin print. The colors are a nice seasonal transition without going into the cliched pastels.

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

Outfit Details

While combing through my closet for spring transitional pieces I wasn’t really finding anything that felt right. Instead of opting to buy something new, which I would only wear for a week or two, then the weather would change and it wouldn’t be useful anymore, I decided to give Rent the Runway a try. To be honest, I’m not sure why I waited so long. I’ve been keeping lists of outfits I love on their site for years. Well, if you’re like me and waiting to try for no particular reason, I can’t say how much I absolutely loved their services, availability, flexibility, pricing, options, customer service… the list goes on and on. I don’t have one bad thing to say.

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler
Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

For my first rental I opted for the Gold Leaf Print Dress from the Kooples in a size XS at $85 for a four day rental (traditional retail $395). There is an option for an eight day rental but I only needed the dress for a Saturday night dinner. What I love about Rent the Runway is they are helping to reduce textile waste (and saving you valuable closet space). How many items do you have in your closet that you bought for a specific event and have never worn again? I’ll put my hand up. I was incredibly guilty of this before turning to sustainable fashion. Another upside to their model is they now offer monthly rental programs for a set fee. There are a couple of great reasons you need this in your life. If you’re struggling to figure out your style and don’t find dressing room try-ons working for you a monthly subscription gives you the option to actually wear pieces in your real, moving, complicated, and busy life. You can try cuts, colors, and shapes you might not otherwise. Monthly subscriptions are also great because they allow you to free up your closet. You can choose pieces that you may want to wear once and then never again but not invest a lot of money in. You get to play and save money!

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

Now in the spirit of honesty – there was one downside. The Kooples dress was a bit big on me. I’m all for flowing dresses but this one didn’t quite sit right on my waist – too low and also too loose. BUT that was my own damn fault. I read the reviews and they all warned that the dress fit on the larger size. So when you’re looking to make your rental read the reviews, look at the customer pictures, and have fun getting lost in the rental culture!

Shop Spring Transitional Pieces

Spring Transitional Pieces - Rent the Runway - World Threads Traveler

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*This post is not sponsored by Rent the Runway. All opinions are my own. It does contain affiliate links which add no additional cost to any purchases you may make. It does however, help keep World Threads Traveler open and operational.

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